5 Upcoming Art Events in Boston

1.   Art Affair

Image courtesy of Alpha Gallery and BADA

Image courtesy of Alpha Gallery and BADA

Where: Adelson Galleries Boston
When: Thursday, March 30, 6-8PM
Cost: Free

Boston Art Dealers Association collaborates to bring you an exhibition from eleven galleries under one roof.  

 

2.   Boston LGBT Film Festival  

Image courtesy of the ICA Boston

Image courtesy of the ICA Boston

Where: The Institute of Contemporary Art
When: Thursday, March 30, 8PM
Cost: $26 for members + students / $30 for nonmemebers

Returning for it’s 33rd edition, The Boston LGBT Film Festival returns to the ICA celebrating the lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender community with a screening of Signature Move.

3.  Caron Tabb at Newton Open Studios  

A Home Called A House, Caron Tabb, Mixed-media on canvas

Where: Newton Open Studios, 859 Washington Street, Newton, MA 02459
When: April 1-2, 11AM-5PM
Cost: Free

Cindy Cuba Clements, Adrienne Shishko, and Caron Tabb invite you to visit their PopUprising open studio.

4.   MassArt Auction Preview Evening with MA-NMWA

Where: Massachusetts College or Art and Design
When:  Wednesday, April 5, 6-8PM

Cost: $30 for members / $50 for nonmembers (Buy tickets here)

Join MA-NMWA (Massachusetts Chapter of The National Museum of Women in the Arts) for a unique evening to preview art works to be offered in the MassArt Auction on April 8th.

Photo courtesy of https://massart.edu/auction

Photo courtesy of https://massart.edu/auction

5.   MassArt Auction

Where: Massachusetts College or Art and Design
When: Saturday, April 8, 6:30 PM
Cost: Varied by ticket (MassArt Auction Tickets)

Celebrate the 28th MassArt Auction with a live and silent auction, cocktails and more. Proceeds go to scholarship aid and academic program support.

Time is Running Out to See Christian Marclay's "The Clock"

Christian Marclay. Video still from The Clock. 2010. Single-channel video with sound, 24 hours. © Christian Marclay. Courtesy of MoMA, New York & Paula Cooper Gallery, New York

Christian Marclay. Video still from The Clock. 2010. Single-channel video with sound, 24 hours. © Christian Marclay. Courtesy of MoMA, New York & Paula Cooper Gallery, New York

We seldom think about the connotations of a clock when it hangs unnoticed in the back wall of a room, but as soon as our eye meets its ticking hands, an emotional reaction is inevitable. Christian Marclay’s “The Clock” analyzes time-based art using time itself, taking the viewer on a 24-hour journey through every era of film. Every minute is a clip from a film that notes the exact time to the second, synched up to the time zone of its exhibition space.

While the film itself has no plot or continuous narrative, it manages to build and break tension on a scene-by-scene basis. It follows the expectations built by decades of cinema, traveling from one dark hallway to another. Every minute compounds our anxiety and desire for the suspense to culminate into some resolution, before suddenly subverting it and switching gears completely. Each character waits for something that will never occur, runs after something they will never reach, introduces a gun which will never be fired. Sometimes several seconds pass without any sign of a clock, and you find yourself waiting, searching for someone to show you the time.

Filled with action, humor and intrigue, The Clock is a multifaceted examination of our relationship with time, built from the most time-reliant medium. It acknowledges the expectations and emotional impulses generated by an awareness of time without indulgence, and brings us face-to-face with our mortality by simply letting us watch it pass.

The Clock is on view at the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston through January 29th, 2017. 

Fine Art Gift Guide: What's in my 2016 Holiday Budget?

This time of year, many of our clients are looking to give the gift of art, or treat themselves after earning that holiday bonus. Here is our 2016 guide with examples of the work you have to choose from in the wide range of fine art available.

UNDER $100

If you're looking for a small, inexpensive add-on for the art-lover on your list, a framed print is the best option.

Kat Katie Wild Limited edition signed print Edition of 5 11 x 14 in. $50

Kat
Katie Wild
Limited edition signed print
Edition of 5
11 x 14 in.
$50

 

$100 -$500

At this price range, you can either find larger high-quality editioned prints, or start shopping originals. Works on paper are most common under $500, and with a nice frame, can be a great addition to someone's art collection.

Kwait (Flower), 2016 Natalia Wróbel Watercolor on handmade Italian paper 4.5 x 6.75 in. $275 (framed)

Kwait (Flower), 2016
Natalia Wróbel
Watercolor on handmade Italian paper
4.5 x 6.75 in.
$275 (framed)

$500 - $1,500

Above $500, you can kickstart someone's collection with a small painting or sculpture.

Slack Water, 2014 Keenan Derby Acrylic and sand on panel 12 x 9 in. $1,400

Slack Water, 2014
Keenan Derby
Acrylic and sand on panel
12 x 9 in.
$1,400

Curl, 2016 Jenny Swanson Saggar fired earthenware, terra sigillata, wire 6.5 in. (height) $950

Curl, 2016
Jenny Swanson
Saggar fired earthenware, terra sigillata, wire
6.5 in. (height)
$950

$1,500 - $3,000

Above $1,500, a variety of sizes and mediums become available. If you really want a larger work to fill someone's empty wall or furnish their new home, look into supporting an emerging artist. Mid-sized framed photography prints are also an excellent option.

Reflections on McGregor Lake, 2016 Caron Tabb Acrylic and charcoal on canvas 48 x 30 in. $2,800

Reflections on McGregor Lake, 2016
Caron Tabb
Acrylic and charcoal on canvas
48 x 30 in.
$2,800

 
Samson, 2016 Benjamin Flythe Archival pigment print. 24 x 30 in. $2,500 (framed)

Samson, 2016
Benjamin Flythe
Archival pigment print.
24 x 30 in.
$2,500 (framed)

$3,000 - $8,000

In the mid-thousands, moderately-sized works and a wider range of sculpture become more accessible. Mid-sized oil paintings, which can be more expensive due to the inherent cost of the medium, are now within range. 

Winter Mountain, 2016 Julia S. Powell Oil on linen 36 x 24 in. $4,500

Winter Mountain, 2016
Julia S. Powell
Oil on linen
36 x 24 in.
$4,500

Verano, 2016 Elisa Adams Soapstone 8 x 14 x 6 in. $7,900

Verano, 2016
Elisa Adams
Soapstone
8 x 14 x 6 in.
$7,900

$8,000 – $12,000

If your budget is more open, and can extend into the $10,000's, larger paintings, as well as mid-sized work by more mid-career and established artists become available.

Plunk, 2016 Adria Arch 72 x 60 in. Acrylic on canvas $10,000

Plunk, 2016
Adria Arch
72 x 60 in.
Acrylic on canvas
$10,000

$12,000 - $20,000

For a really special work of art, there is no real limit. Past a certain point, there's a variety of established artists to choose from. Many galleries offer payment plans and services like Art Money offer loan programs to help you purchase that perfect piece. 

Spatial Apperception, 2010 Soo Sunny Park Shoe polish, paint, graphite on paper 61 x 60 in. Contact for Price

Spatial Apperception, 2010
Soo Sunny Park
Shoe polish, paint, graphite on paper
61 x 60 in.
Contact for Price

 

 

Wednesday, December 14, 2016: Puloma Ghosh